The 2020 Thanksgiving Dilemma

By | | A.R. Mazzotta News

“Give thanks not just on Thanksgiving Day, but every day of your life. Appreciate and never take for granted all that you have.” – Catherine Pulsifer

 The question pinging through many a mind as the calendar flips to November: Will we have Thanksgiving this year? To be clear, it is not the date or day that is in question. Rather, celebrating the fourth Thursday-in-November holiday when family and friends gather, in thanksgiving, for a feast.

As the coronavirus continues to impact our lives, we cannot help but wonder if Thanksgiving will be another casualty of COVID-19. It is easy to focus on all the pandemic has taken from us, but dwelling on the “can’t do” will only increase the sense of loss and frustration, which so many of us are experiencing.

If we could, most of us would jump at the chance to rewrite much of 2020. Yet, at the same time, this most challenging year has gifted us with a depth of vision that smooth-sailing times rarely produces.

Shares greeting card aficionado Taylor F, “We’d even argue one of the greatest gifts this challenging year has given us was a new perspective on the things we’ve been taking for granted all this time! A new perspective on just how grateful we are for the simplest of things.”

To gather or not to gather . . .

The CDC advises a cautious approach concerning holiday gatherings, noting that celebrating virtually or with your household members poses the least risk for virus spread. When it comes to the larger groups we look forward to every year; the decision process should include an assessment of the risks based on several factors, including—

  • The community levels of COVID-19 – Consider the number and rate of COVID-19 cases in the community and where the celebration will occur. Gatherings with attendees traveling from different places pose a higher risk than gatherings with attendees who live in the same area.
  • The location of the gathering – Indoor gatherings generally pose more risk than do outdoor gatherings. Indoor gatherings with poor ventilation pose more risk than those with open windows or doors.
  • The duration of the gathering – Gatherings that last longer pose more risk than shorter gatherings.
  • The number of people at the gathering – Larger groups pose more risk than gatherings with fewer people. The ability to limit contact between attendees should be a factor in determining the group’s size. The CDC does not limit or recommend a specific number of attendees for gatherings.
  • The behaviors of attendees before the gathering – If attendees have not been actively practicing social distancing (staying at least 6 feet apart), mask-wearing, and handwashing, such gatherings will pose more risk than events with attendees who have complied with preventative behaviors.
  • The behaviors of attendees during the gathering– Gatherings, where preventive measures such as mask-wearing, social distancing, and hand washing are being practiced will pose less risk than gatherings where fewer or no preventive measures are being implemented.

Finally, don’t forget to check with CT guidelines:  https://portal.ct.gov/Coronavirus/Covid-19-Knowledge-Base/Latest-Guidance

At A. R. Mazzotta, we are thankful for the continuing opportunity to assist businesses across the great state of Connecticut with their staffing needs. Our team represents some of the most experienced job recruiters in Connecticut, employing, and placing approximately 1,000 candidates each year. Call us today to reach a real person committed to serving your company.